Cover Art Boards!

Today I received concept boards for The Last April and I’m so excited. I posted a blurry photo on Instagram, but here you can see breaks about how my cover artist takes my submission details and finds elements to tease out what the final concept should trend to. I used Seedlings for the Haunting Miss Trentwood rebranded and used her work to inspire a DIY rebrand of Catching the Rose to fit in with whatever she comes up with for The Last April.

This is getting real you guys! Book launch party April 15th! Looking up blog hop contests for April and May to really get the word out there, along with some Goodreads contests.

I’m on Patreon!

Lovelies,

I have edited 15 of 33 chapters for The Last April, my upcoming book! I hope to send it to my editor by the end of the month.

As I’m sure you know, the cost of producing a quality book is substantial. My production team is amazing, and I’m considering expansion to include an audiobook as well as eBook and print books for The Last April. Unfortunately, this is more than my collected funds can cover. Rather than running a Kickstarter campaign like I did for Haunting Miss Trentwood, I’m trying out Patreon.

Patreon is a wonderful way for the community to support my projects while still allowing me to pay for editors, cover artists, and silly things like food and mortgages. It comes from the traditional use of “patron” where a person gives financial support to a person, organization, cause, or activity. This is like the modern version of a Renaissance painter requiring a patron so they can eat and make art!

This is an experiment. Who knows how much momentum will grow or if I cancel this soon after The Last April‘s release. You’re not obligated to support me. I love that you read my content and make comments. My content on Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, and blog will remain free. The newsletter is also free. If you are able to contribute one dollar a month, that’s fantastic!

Why am I on Patreon?

Back in 2003, I self-published my first book as a high school student. It has been a long journey since then! In the (now 14) years since, I learned a lot about what it takes to be an independent author who creates quality work. 

The biggest thing I’ve learned is that quality work comes with financial investment, not only in the current project, but future projects as well. Back in 2010, I ran a successful Kickstarter campaign for my last young adult historical, Haunting Miss Trentwood. I enjoyed the excitement and interaction of crowdfunding, and the community feeling in general.

However, that funding covered the production costs for that book only. My projects since have come out of pocket, including a children’s storybook, a how to book, and new cover designs for the existing historical novels in preparation for my 2017 project.

I cannot use my paycheck to support my writing, sadly. Creative funds are getting short even though I put whatever royalties I earn from previous projects to my new projects. And so I turn to Patreon.

How will I use the funds?

There are a plethora of things that need to happen with a book release, including…

Editor Fees
A good book is nothing without a good editor. Help me keep my editor on retainer so I have enough to pay her fees so you have excellent fiction to read.

Cover Artist fees
A picture is worth a thousand words, and my stories run in the fifty thousand range. Help me hire cover artists who can best represent my hard work so you have something beautiful for your physical and digital bookshelves.

Marketing fees
When I announce a new post on Facebook, a Facebook boost makes sure that the announcement gets onto 1/3 or 1/2 of my followers’ News Feeds. I also need to purchase ads across Amazon, Facebook, and other popular locations. My blog gets a fair amount of traffic each month, and hosting and maintenance fees can add up.

What are you offering Patrons?
Other than the satisfactory glow you’ll feel by helping a writer pursue her publication goals, you will receive Patron Exclusive content that you won’t see on InstagramFacebookTwitter, or my blog. Depending on your subscription level, you have the option to be a part of my Beta Reader group, who will give me feedback on drafts before they are ready for publication.

I hope this grows, but that’s really up to you, Patrons. If I have enough income to let go of some hours at work, I can redirect those hours to my writing and therefore, you!

IMPORTANT NOTE:I set up this as a monthly pledge. If you are an amazing human who would like to donate a higher amount but only intend to make it as a one-off payment, please make sure you choose the right option. Also, please read Patreon’s page on calculating fees. Your pledges will convert into $USD, so donations will be subjected to conversion rates. There is also a small surcharge to keep Patreon funded.

Editing Bullet Journal Tracking for Fiction Writers

If you missed it on Instagram (Facebook, Twitter), I completed the first draft of my novella last week and dove right into editing! I’m so excited, that I’m breaking my monthly posting schedule to share the happy news! Now onto my favorite part: editing.

I love editing because there is material to work with. I can print things out, cut them up, move them around. For this novella, I’m doing a combination of analog and digital editing techniques.

Digital Editing Tools

I keep the manuscript in Microsoft Word and sync it across devices using Google Drive. I edit for passive voice, readability (grade level), and adverbs using the Hemingway App. I bought the desktop version, but it’s very buggy, so if you need an editor I’d use the free online version. This will allow me to submit a manuscript edit to my editor, who will find things I couldn’t, even with the digital tools.

Caveat: Digital editors will never replace a human. I use Hemingway to help find my blind spots. I default to passive voice and adverbs, so luckily, this tool helps me. If you have different writing crutches, you might need to look elsewhere for help.

Analog Editing Tools

I have my little desk calendar to tell me how many days in a month I spend on writing (first image in this post). I also created a bullet journal tracker for editing each chapter. Details below!

Typically, habit trackers are for days, weeks, or months. Whatever the unit of time, assign it as your table column headings. For editing, my columns are each chapter, 1 – 33. So it’s almost like a month anyway.

The rows are the habits you’re tracking, or for editing, the lenses you use to edit your work. I have rows for:

  • Plot holes
  • Research
  • No prose contractions i.e. narrative should not have contractions but dialogue can
  • Ready for editor
  • Ready for beta readers

I have space on the page to add more lenses as they come up. I’m through chapter 6 and haven’t thought of anything yet. I have a list of questions I need to address before the book ends, or little reminders I forgot because it took me three years to write the first draft. For instance, by the last chapter, one of the rooms in the house no longer exists. So half of the chapters I’ve touched included me removing that room and shifting where the characters are interacting.

I shared this with the Bullet Journal Writers Facebook group and got a positive response, so I wanted to share in case it might help you with your writing!

Tomorrow, we’ll return to my regular monthly blog post: I participated in a monthly writing challenge (six word stories for thirty-one days). With the release of this book coming in April, I expect to break my monthly posting schedule quite a bit.

Here are some additional resources that can help you: