The Last April Cover Concepts!

So very excited that my cover artist sent me these last week. We’ve decided on a concept that actually combines the best of both… the blue color scheme, more of the corn stalks, switching the flags (Gretchen is Union, Karl is Confederate)… but ultimately we’re going with the left cover.

I’m so excited you guys! This is happening!

If you’re in the Columbus, OH area, you’re invited to the book launch party. I hope to see you on April 15 from 2:30 – 4:30 PM for snacks and beverages and fun times in general!

Check out my Facebook event for more information..

First Chapter Reveal from THE LAST APRIL

The Last April, An Ohio Civil War Novel

We are in the final editing days for The Last April, my new young adult historical fiction book with a planned release of April 2017. My beta readers and editor have sent feedback and I’m crawling through the manuscript making updates. In the meantime, I wanted to share the first chapter of The Last April for your reading pleasure.

Join me on Patreon to see the proposed concepts by my cover artist! You are under no obligation to contribute, but with your patronage I can release an audiobook in 2017 or early 2018. Thank you to my supporters so far!

Here is a snippet of the first chapter of The Last April:

Everyone else would remember that Saturday as the day President Lincoln died. Gretchen Miller would remember it as the day the ragged man collapsed at her feet.

Gretchen was tugging at weeds and swatting at gnats when a thud made her whip around. The war was over, but Confederate supporters were everywhere. They lingered after General Lee’s surrender, and President Lincoln’s reconciliation speech, and in pro-Union Columbus.

Gretchen snapped up from her hunched position to lean back on her barefoot heels. Her skirts puffed out with the movement. She slapped them down, annoyed.

Sharp sunlight made it difficult to see. Gretchen thought she saw a collapsed man just yards from her hem. She dragged her straw hat by the strings so it shaded her eyes.

A man’s limbs sprawled across the oak tree roots. Gretchen could not tell his age or condition from where she crouched. His back was to her, his dark head resting on his outstretched arm. He was not moving.

“May the angels have charge of me,” Gretchen whispered. She patted the revolver in her skirt pocket.

His leg twitched.

Gretchen’s heart leaped. That dark, matted hair gave her a turn. Maybe it was her brother Werner, returned from war at last. A hundred men from the Grove City area had answered President Lincoln’s call for soldiers. Everyone was afraid of the number that would return.

Gretchen grabbed her skirts as she scrambled to standing. She flailed her arms at the log farmhouse she called home. She could not shout, in case the man had faked his injury and was waiting for an excuse to attack.

Her aunt, Tante Klegg, stuck her head out the kitchen door. “What is it?” Tante Klegg’s heavy German accent was strident in the quiet morning. It matched the severity of her hair braided and twisted tight against her head.

Gretchen put her finger to her lips. She cupped her hands around her mouth so her whisper would carry. “There is a man.” She waved at her aunt to come outside.

Tante Klegg tiptoed across the rocks Gretchen had overturned gardening. She held her skirt layers high above her ankles, muttering.

The man remained quiet, only his twitching foot letting them know he lived. Gretchen did not know if that meant he was dangerous or that he was too injured to move.

Gretchen brushed a strand of reddish hair from her mouth as the breeze picked up. Though it was April, the humidity was heavy and stifling. The wind still carried the scent of cooling bonfires from yesterday’s elaborate celebrations.

Last night, Gretchen had danced until her feet ached and sung until her voice was hoarse. She had been ready to do anything to help her country heal. She held onto the president’s words of reconciliation. She hoped everyone could see the Confederates as prodigal brothers and sisters. She hoped the Confederates would be humble and welcomed home.

With a stranger at her feet, Gretchen realized such things were easier said than done. She gripped the revolver and held out her other hand to stop her aunt from advancing. Holding her breath, she crept closer.

The man perhaps could have been her brother, once upon a time. His body was gaunt, worn thin by trials Gretchen suspected she would never understand. His left hand did not bear Werner’s distinctive strawberry-shaped birthmark.

This was not her brother.

 

Cover Art Boards!

Today I received concept boards for The Last April and I’m so excited. I posted a blurry photo on Instagram, but here you can see breaks about how my cover artist takes my submission details and finds elements to tease out what the final concept should trend to. I used Seedlings for the Haunting Miss Trentwood rebranded and used her work to inspire a DIY rebrand of Catching the Rose to fit in with whatever she comes up with for The Last April.

This is getting real you guys! Book launch party April 15th! Looking up blog hop contests for April and May to really get the word out there, along with some Goodreads contests.

I’m on Patreon!

Lovelies,

I have edited 15 of 33 chapters for The Last April, my upcoming book! I hope to send it to my editor by the end of the month.

As I’m sure you know, the cost of producing a quality book is substantial. My production team is amazing, and I’m considering expansion to include an audiobook as well as eBook and print books for The Last April. Unfortunately, this is more than my collected funds can cover. Rather than running a Kickstarter campaign like I did for Haunting Miss Trentwood, I’m trying out Patreon.

Patreon is a wonderful way for the community to support my projects while still allowing me to pay for editors, cover artists, and silly things like food and mortgages. It comes from the traditional use of “patron” where a person gives financial support to a person, organization, cause, or activity. This is like the modern version of a Renaissance painter requiring a patron so they can eat and make art!

This is an experiment. Who knows how much momentum will grow or if I cancel this soon after The Last April‘s release. You’re not obligated to support me. I love that you read my content and make comments. My content on Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, and blog will remain free. The newsletter is also free. If you are able to contribute one dollar a month, that’s fantastic!

Why am I on Patreon?

Back in 2003, I self-published my first book as a high school student. It has been a long journey since then! In the (now 14) years since, I learned a lot about what it takes to be an independent author who creates quality work. 

The biggest thing I’ve learned is that quality work comes with financial investment, not only in the current project, but future projects as well. Back in 2010, I ran a successful Kickstarter campaign for my last young adult historical, Haunting Miss Trentwood. I enjoyed the excitement and interaction of crowdfunding, and the community feeling in general.

However, that funding covered the production costs for that book only. My projects since have come out of pocket, including a children’s storybook, a how to book, and new cover designs for the existing historical novels in preparation for my 2017 project.

I cannot use my paycheck to support my writing, sadly. Creative funds are getting short even though I put whatever royalties I earn from previous projects to my new projects. And so I turn to Patreon.

How will I use the funds?

There are a plethora of things that need to happen with a book release, including…

Editor Fees
A good book is nothing without a good editor. Help me keep my editor on retainer so I have enough to pay her fees so you have excellent fiction to read.

Cover Artist fees
A picture is worth a thousand words, and my stories run in the fifty thousand range. Help me hire cover artists who can best represent my hard work so you have something beautiful for your physical and digital bookshelves.

Marketing fees
When I announce a new post on Facebook, a Facebook boost makes sure that the announcement gets onto 1/3 or 1/2 of my followers’ News Feeds. I also need to purchase ads across Amazon, Facebook, and other popular locations. My blog gets a fair amount of traffic each month, and hosting and maintenance fees can add up.

What are you offering Patrons?
Other than the satisfactory glow you’ll feel by helping a writer pursue her publication goals, you will receive Patron Exclusive content that you won’t see on InstagramFacebookTwitter, or my blog. Depending on your subscription level, you have the option to be a part of my Beta Reader group, who will give me feedback on drafts before they are ready for publication.

I hope this grows, but that’s really up to you, Patrons. If I have enough income to let go of some hours at work, I can redirect those hours to my writing and therefore, you!

IMPORTANT NOTE:I set up this as a monthly pledge. If you are an amazing human who would like to donate a higher amount but only intend to make it as a one-off payment, please make sure you choose the right option. Also, please read Patreon’s page on calculating fees. Your pledges will convert into $USD, so donations will be subjected to conversion rates. There is also a small surcharge to keep Patreon funded.

Six Word Challenge Reveal

Happy new year, everyone! I’m pushing ahead with my novel, but in the meantime, wanted to share my six word challenge results from M.J.’s (@pageflutter on Instagram) “Six Word Challenge.” A six word challenge encourage you to spend 5 – 30 minutes a day coming up with a six word story based on a prompt.

I’ve been documenting some of my progress on Instagram… But here is my complete list!

Day Prompt Story
1 Gift exchange “But… I love you.”
“Thank you.”
2 Snowflakes “Watch out for the danger flakes.”
3 Reunited Gilmore Girls stayed same. I changed.
4 Under the Ice I won’t tell if you won’t.
5 Stuffed! “Of course I’m stuffed,” Eeyore sighed.
6 Under the Mistletoe “Well. I didn’t expect you here.”
 7  Dreaded Relative Everyone knew why they were invited.
 8  Bundle Up “It’s cold outside, baby.”
“Nice try.”
 9 Wonderland Hate this song. Stop the memories.
 10  Evergreen Wrinkled lips, trembling. Their final kiss.
 11  Dear Santa… An entire movie to accept Rudolph?!
 12  Sugar & Spice Once a currency, now cheap commodity.
 13 Wood Pile Hidden behind wood pile, she waits.
 14  Snow Day! Happily trapped in a snow globe.
 15 Office Party Reminder: Drinks limited. He breaks rules.
 16  On the Roof Rooftop date. Stargazing between tiny kisses.
 17  The List Relishing being on her sh*t list.
 18  Feast …End of days. Feast now, son.
 19  By the Fire Drawn by the frozen fire, smiling.
 20  Hot Cocoa Scalding, yet satisfying. Gotta have marshmallows.
 21  Unwanted Gift The cat doesn’t get my horror.
 22  Frozen “Let it go! Let—”
“Dude! Stop.”
 23  Care Package  Care package for sale. Donations accepted.
 24  First Candle  Candles lit. Stories told. Smiles shared.
 25  The Mensch  She helped, never hoping to receive.
 26  In the Box  Pandora tucked hope in the box.
 27  Heritage  “We are do-zers. We must do.”
 28  Helping Hand  She stood, ignoring his outstretched hand.
 29  White Elephant  Ultimately, the ring was never chosen.
 30  Cheers!  Everybody knows your name here. Why?
 31  Fresh Start  “Tomorrow is another day!”
“…Drama queen.”

Do you have any monthly challenges that you love and want to share?

Editing Bullet Journal Tracking for Fiction Writers

If you missed it on Instagram (Facebook, Twitter), I completed the first draft of my novella last week and dove right into editing! I’m so excited, that I’m breaking my monthly posting schedule to share the happy news! Now onto my favorite part: editing.

I love editing because there is material to work with. I can print things out, cut them up, move them around. For this novella, I’m doing a combination of analog and digital editing techniques.

Digital Editing Tools

I keep the manuscript in Microsoft Word and sync it across devices using Google Drive. I edit for passive voice, readability (grade level), and adverbs using the Hemingway App. I bought the desktop version, but it’s very buggy, so if you need an editor I’d use the free online version. This will allow me to submit a manuscript edit to my editor, who will find things I couldn’t, even with the digital tools.

Caveat: Digital editors will never replace a human. I use Hemingway to help find my blind spots. I default to passive voice and adverbs, so luckily, this tool helps me. If you have different writing crutches, you might need to look elsewhere for help.

Analog Editing Tools

I have my little desk calendar to tell me how many days in a month I spend on writing (first image in this post). I also created a bullet journal tracker for editing each chapter. Details below!

Typically, habit trackers are for days, weeks, or months. Whatever the unit of time, assign it as your table column headings. For editing, my columns are each chapter, 1 – 33. So it’s almost like a month anyway.

The rows are the habits you’re tracking, or for editing, the lenses you use to edit your work. I have rows for:

  • Plot holes
  • Research
  • No prose contractions i.e. narrative should not have contractions but dialogue can
  • Ready for editor
  • Ready for beta readers

I have space on the page to add more lenses as they come up. I’m through chapter 6 and haven’t thought of anything yet. I have a list of questions I need to address before the book ends, or little reminders I forgot because it took me three years to write the first draft. For instance, by the last chapter, one of the rooms in the house no longer exists. So half of the chapters I’ve touched included me removing that room and shifting where the characters are interacting.

I shared this with the Bullet Journal Writers Facebook group and got a positive response, so I wanted to share in case it might help you with your writing!

Tomorrow, we’ll return to my regular monthly blog post: I participated in a monthly writing challenge (six word stories for thirty-one days). With the release of this book coming in April, I expect to break my monthly posting schedule quite a bit.

Here are some additional resources that can help you:

Working with a New Cover Artist

Hello lovelies, today, I deliver my experience working with a new cover artist.

I worked with a cover artist when I first published Catching the Rose in high school (far left). It’s a sweet cover, however, it was too pink and it didn’t feel very modern. Plus, I changed my author brand and wanted to resubmit under the name Belinda Kroll.

When I republished Catching the Rose (middle), I did the new cover work. I also did the original cover for Haunting Miss Trentwood (right). At the time, I thought I was catering to women who preferred sweet romances… Not that you could tell by the covers I created! The original for Catching the Rose was more accurate, but I didn’t have rights to the image for re-publication, unfortunately.

Haunting Miss Trentwood

I’ve known for some time that the covers I created wasn’t getting to my desired audience. I knew this because the Amazon “Customers who bought this item also bought” did not match my expectations. Readers seem to get the gothic part, but not the comedy or light-heartedness of what could have been a very sad, morbid tale.

So here are my tips regarding cover artists…

Know What You Want

Find Examples

Seriously. Don’t commission a cover artist until you have a solid understanding of your genre and audience. Read a lot of books. Collect covers of the books you want to emulate or compete against. I had a secret Pinterest board just for cover art.

Write Good Content

Know how to write compelling back cover copy. I scoured Amazon looking for good descriptions that made me want to read the book. I keep a file of good descriptions. I spent an entire afternoon picking the structure apart so I could replicate the recipe.

Determine Your Distribution

Know where you want to publish your book. If you’re working with print, Amazon’s CreateSpace has different standards than Lightning Source’s IngramSpark. If you’re working with eBook only, that is an important distinction as well.

Find a Cover Artist

Believe it or not, I found my cover artist by looking on the back cover of a book released by a newer member of my writer’s group. I visited her website and looked at every cover she had created. I confirmed she followed the young adult historical trend, but not in a derivative way. I confirmed she understood the genre, young adult historical comedic gothic (say that three times fast). I confirmed she had an online presence (Facebook, Pinterest, Twitter, Instagram, any would have worked for me) so I could determine her responsiveness.

Plus, I read in her bio that she lives in my city. I love that! I was so excited to support a local artist. Things you should keep in mind when choosing your cover artist:

  1. Are they design savvy?
  2. Do they understand your genre?
  3. Do they understand your audience?
  4. Are they responsive?
  5. Are they in your budget?

Contact/Commission a Cover Artist

Once I was convinced, I contacted her through her website. This was her preferred method of communication. For the love of all that is efficient, don’t contact your desired cover artist through your preferred contact method. You’ll never get a response and you’ll lose the opportunity. This is a time for the two of you to interview one another. You’re looking for a solid professional relationship, where both parties can commit to a timeline and have explicit expectations about what is required to complete the task.

A professional cover artist, no matter how much they charge for their services, will have a design brief/form for you to fill out. On this form, you will (should) be required to provide:

  • Title / subtitle
  • Author name
  • Tagline
  • Back cover copy
  • Author bio

My cover artist also asked for content ideas. She wanted to know the theme of the story, who the main characters were with generic physical descriptions, any important scenery details*, and any important relationships.

* Haunting Miss Trentwood is an English manor story; we don’t leave the house so it became a feature of the cover.

A professional cover artist will also have a contract for you to sign. This should include all the details of your agreement, including:

  • Deposit/retainer for services
  • Estimated total fee
  • Timeline
  • Who covers cost for stock art
  • How many design hours are included in the base price
  • How many revisions are included
  • What happens if a change request occurs (what constitutes a change request? are there fees associated?)
  • What are the final file formats
  • When/How are the files delivered

Collaborate with Your Cover Artist i.e. Let Them Do Their Job

Now, my cover artist was super fun to work with. I had this idea in my head, and I felt pretty strongly about it. However, I’m a software designer by trade and I know when my client thinks they know what is best… they usually don’t. So I gave her exactly what I thought I wanted, I gave details about wanting silhouettes, a bright cover, a bit of mystery, and some color suggestions. I gave her access to my secret Pinterest board. And then I sat back and waited. Anxiously, like a kid at Christmas told not to touch any of the presents.

She blew me away with her collaboration skills. I approved all silhouettes before they were composed together in the final cover art. I approved the fonts. I approved the color scheme. Then I sat back and waited again for the first draft composition. I basically went with her design with minor tweaks.

The back cover was easier since it’s simpler. I submitted my publisher logo (Bright Bird Press), my author bio and author photo. I like to include my author photo because I write under a pen name and it’s nice to confirm with family and friends that I did, in fact, just publish a book.

You can tell from the before and after that hiring a cover designer is definitely worth it…

If you’ve been on the fence about hiring a cover artist, I encourage you to do your research. Hire someone you can trust. Someone you can collaborate with. Someone who makes you dance with joy when you receive your new cover art!