Reading: The Wild Child

the wild childTitle: The Wild Child
Author: Mary Jo Putney
Genre: Historical Romance
Length: 310 pages

Summary: Meriel’s beauty is more than fey, it is rumored she returned from India after the murder of her parents when she was five-years-old madder than any hatter in all of England. Dominic, though entirely against the idea, has agreed to help his twin brother Kyle to woo the mad, mute heiress. In exchange, Dominic will be awarded land of his own, which is all he has ever wanted his entire life. He never expected to fall in love her. He never expected he would take on the impossible task to make her speak again.

Excerpt:

pg 148 – God knew that he was living proof that, for despite all his warnings to himself, he had fallen in love with her. She elicited tenderness and desire, laughter and wonder, a fierce need to protect her from all threats.

Why should you read this book?

Another book which tackles the aftermath of a traumatic event, this time the raid of a compound while in India which leads to the murder of the heroine’s parents. Meriel returns from India a mute, content to spend her days in her extensive English garden communing with nature and ignoring the pain of the human world. When Dominic arrives, having never been able to stand watching any animal hurt, he finds a kindred spirit in Meriel, despite her silence.

Though the plot is fairly standard for historical fiction, as always, Putney’s characters shine. Meriel has these inklings, a different understanding of the world. She sees beauty in weeds, auras around those who matter, and disregards societal rules. Which made for her seductive pursuit of Dominic rather entertaining. She had watched animals in rut for years, she thinks she understands what is to be done. Poor Dominic, though he had rakish years, is mortified, making for humorous and sensual scenes where he clutches the arms of chairs and refuses to look at Meriel as she pursues him.

I feel as though the treatment of the relationship between the twins Kyle and Dominic could have been explored more. I loved the tender and passionate relationship between Dominic and Meriel. Again, this is a story where the beta hero shines, helping the heroine come out of her shell so they can have a healthy, equal relationship. Read this book for an unconventional heroine, a wonderful beta hero that I’d want to bring home with me, and hints of Putney’s Guardian series through the odd little quirks Meriel exhibits.